Advanced technology in climate chambers

Advanced technology in climate chambers

Request by the University of Amsterdam: Develop climate chambers for the greatest possible number of different experimental conditions. Variables such as light, air, heat and nutrition to be easily set, logged and archived.

  • Amsterdam
  • University of Amsterdam
  • November 2018

ENGIE Refrigeration (formerly known as Cofely Refrigeration) developed climate chambers with advanced technologies in which in-depth experiments can be performed with the essential variables of light, air, heat and nourishment to optimise and study the growth of young plants.

Accurate research

The Faculty of Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science (FNWI) is one of the University of Amsterdam’s (UvA) educational and research units. In the faculty, various specialised research groups are studying phytopathology and plant physiology, amongst other things. A number of aspects are crucial to this research. In order to guarantee the accuracy of the research, the experiments must always be conducted under exactly the same conditions. It must also be possible to accurately harmonise the diversity of the elements with each other and to log and archive the experimental conditions, such as settings and realised conditions. ENGIE was able to realise all of the above with new and improved technologies. These new technologies, such as LED lighting and fluorescent lighting, allow for the optimal growth of the plants.

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Uniform test results

UvA asked ENGIE to build a total of 46 climate chambers so that it could work with as many different experimental conditions as possible. Many of them (24) consist of rooms with racks with test trays. Each of the test trays has exactly the same micro-climate, which enables the various experiments in one climate chamber to be conducted under the same ambient conditions. ENGIE also installed seven chambers with canopies plus 15 refrigeration/deep-freeze cells.